Looking for a Job? Beware!

Earlier this year I spend a couple of months looking for a job as a web developer in the South Florida area. This was my first time looking for a job and there where a couple of things that I noticed while searching. First, there are not that many “good” opportunities out here in South Florida and second, IF there is an opportunity, the desired requirements looks a lot like an ingredient list for a pie. Long story short I applied for some of these job openings as I wanted to find a job fast and I also felt that I had almost all of the desired requirements.

However back then I didn’t realize the error of looking into jobs with long requirements. Originally I thought that the lists where more of an employer’s wish list, wishful thinking that a candidate with all the trades would show up on their front door. What I didn’t realize back then is that I could potentially be the only one at that position. In other words I would be the only person doing what I do at that particular company. Back then I didn’t think that was such a horrible scenario, but now I know that is a mistake.

The main problem with being the only one with your level of skills in the company, is that there is no one else to bounce ideas with, no one to give you a hand when you have a mental block or anyone that understands/appreciates the complexity/difficulty of the job at hand. Usually employer’s with wish lists want a person that can do it all, they want someone who can do for one salary what two or more should do.

So next time that you are on a job interview ask with how many co-workers you will be interacting with directly. Trust me on this one, you do not want to be the lone ranger at the park.

Interesting View On Looking For Good Programmers

I recently started looking for a Job as a developer, either web or stand-alone, and while searching thru some job listings I saw a common trend. They(employers) do not necessarily understand what to look for in a person to fill in a position.

I found this post on digg and thought that I share almost all of this persons views of who is a good programmer.

I particularly agree on his view of self-learning. I know many programmers who complain about new technologies and dont want to learn it unless they are sent to a course or the company invests in (pays) them to learn a new technology.

A good programmer doesn’t need a training course to learn a new technology. In fact, the great programmer will be the one talking your ear off about a new technology that you haven’t even heard of, explaining to you why you must use it in your business, even if none of your staff knows how to use it. Even if it’s a technology he doesn’t know how to use yet.